Defining Your FTTH Network | Corning

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What Type of FTTH Network Do I Need?

What Type of FTTH Network Do I Need?

Whether you are deploying RFoG, GPON, EPON, or looking forward to next-generation PON technologies, all can be accomplished with either a home run, centralized split, or distributed split architecture. With all, you should consider factors such as distance from the central office, future upgradability, OLT port efficiency, and total cost of ownership. Here you can see what these networks look like and what types of products are typically found in each.

Point-to-Point/Direct Drop

Point-to-Point/Direct Drop

  • Typically deployed to subscribers within five miles of central office in conjunction with centralised split and distributed split architectures
  • Home run architectures offer dedicated fibre from CO/HE to each subscriber with no splitters in the field, resulting in the most fibre-rich network architecture

Distributed Split

Distributed Split

  • Gaining popularity in the United States based on widespread success in Latin America and Europe
  • By distributing or cascading splits in two or more field locations, the physical size of products in the field can shrink in size as the ports at each location are shared until the last access point. This is the most fibre-lean network architecture shown

Centralised Split

Centralised Split

  • Most common architecture deployed in the United States and Canada
  • A single, centralised location for housing splitters in the field optimises OLT ports while leaning out the feeder network

FTTH Network Architectures Overview

 

  Point-to-Point/Direct Drop Centralised Split Distributed Split
 


Consolidated Point for Cable and Splicing Management Yes Yes Yes
Cabinets in the Field Yes, as aggregation point Yes Yes
Upfront Network CapEx High Moderate Low
Fiber Density in Feeder/Distribution Rich feeder and distribution cables Lean feeder and rich distribution cables Lean feeder and distribution cables
OLT Ports Efficiency Best Best Fair to poor
Supports Efficient Growth Strategy High High Low to medium
Split Ratios Flexibility High High Low to medium
Easily Adaptable Best Best Fair to poor
Quick Facts • Typically deployed to subscribers within five miles of central office in conjunction with centralised split and distributed split architectures

• Home run architectures offer dedicated fiber from CO/HE to each subscriber with no splitters in the field, resulting in the most fiber-rich network architecture
• Most common architecture deployed in the United States and Canada

• A single, centralised location for housing splitters in the field optimises OLT ports while leaning out the feeder network
• Gaining popularity in the United States based on widespread success in Latin America and Europe

• By distributing or cascading splits in two or more field locations, the physical size of products in the field can shrink in size as the ports at each location are shared until the last access point. This is the most fiber-lean network architecture shown