The Perfect Mix-Up - Molten Glass | Science of Glass | The Glass Age | Corning

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Science of Glass

Science of Glass

Science of Glass

The Perfect Mix-Up

The Perfect Mix-Up

Stirring’s no simple matter when it comes to molten glass

It seems like such a simple thing: Throwing a bunch of ingredients together and stirring until everything’s well-mixed.

But when it comes to making a highly technical, optical glass, the melting and stirring process is just as complex – and must be just as precise – as the glass formula itself.

Researchers must consider every aspect of the mixing action. Blade angles matter. Mixing speed matters.

The ultimate goal is to have a perfectly homogeneous composition without bubbles or other flaws that might change to uniform refractive index of the glass, making it useless for telescope lenses or other optical applications.

How did groundbreaking glass scientists of the 1940s address this problem as World War II was looming? Learn about this unique chapter in glass history here.