Flexible Glass: Enabling Thin, Lightweight, and Flexible Electronics | Ultra-thin, flexible Willow® Glass | Corning

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“Information in this book encourages and enables the identification of advanced flexible glass applications that do not exist today and provides a launching point for exciting future directions.”  - Dr. Sean Garner

CORNING, N.Y. – Six Corning scientists, Drs. Sean Garner, Xinghua Li, Ming-Huang Huang, Scott Glaesemann, Timothy Gross, and Randall Youngman, contributed to the recently published book, Flexible Glass: Enabling Thin, Lightweight, and Flexible Electronics, Wiley-Scrivener, 2017The book’s origin started when Sean, a Senior Research Associate at Corning, was approached by the publisher after a conference presentation to contribute a book on flexible glass. “I was viewing this as a significant opportunity that rarely comes along, and it was a chance to highlight Corning’s contribution to the emerging field of flexible electronics,” he said.

Sean worked with the publisher on the overall book proposal and also recruited authors from throughout the industry to contribute chapters. In fact, he collaborated with all of the contributing authors over the past 10 years as parts of the Corning® Willow® Glass program. After obtaining author commitments, it then took about three years to finalize all of the chapters – including several iterations of writing and editing.

The initial chapter by Sean, Xinghua, and Ming-Huang provides an introduction to flexible glass and a starting point for subsequent chapters on reliability, device fabrication, and applications of flexible glass.

Research Fellow Scott Glaesemann’ s chapter covers the mechanical reliability of flexible glass. “One must minimize and control contact-induced damage and have deep knowledge of applied stresses,” Scott said. “The mechanical reliability of this product can be established based on the same technical foundation that made optical fiber successful.”

Research Fellow Tim Gross’ chapter looks at low modulus, damage resistant glass for ultra-thin glass applications. Tim said this focuses on “managing flaw size and bend induced stresses to enable the bending of thin glass to small radii.”   
 
Ultimately, the book is meant to serve as a resource for identifying new device designs, glass applications, and manufacturing processes for which flexible glass substrates are uniquely suited. According to Sean, “information in this book encourages and enables the identification of advanced flexible glass applications that do not exist today and provides a launching point for exciting future directions.”  As Dr. Peter Bocko mentions in the book’s foreword – “the long-incubated flexible glass revolution is upon us.”

The book, Flexible Glass: Enabling Thin, Lightweight, and Flexible Electronics is currently available for purchase on Amazon and Wiley.

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