Webinar: 3D Tissue Models for Analyzing Dermatologic and Respiratory Systems

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Webinar: 3D Tissue Models for Analyzing Dermatologic and Respiratory Systems
Webinar: 3D Tissue Models for Analyzing Dermato...
January 28, 2015 | 12:00 AM
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Join us on January 28th for a special Corning-sponsored webinar presented by ATCC®.

Abstract:

The significance of 3D tissue modeling opens up new possibilities for the study of complex physiological processes in vitro. Advances in cell isolation, media development, substrates, and growth surfaces are leading to culture environments that provide better biological and functional properties than traditional 2D cell culture. These models may provide a more predictive analysis and result in a more streamlined process of drug discovery and development. In this webinar, we will discuss recent developments in 3D modeling using ATCC primary and hTERT immortalized cells with specialized Corning® permeable support culture systems in dermatologic and respiratory studies.

Biography:

Dr. Yukari Tokuyama is a Field Application Scientist at ATCC. Prior to this role, she led the Stem Cell Product Development group and focused on products for human induced pluripotent stem cells and lineage specific differentiation. She earned her Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, where she studied the mechanism of genomic instability in cancer. She completed her post-doctoral training at the Oregon Health & Science University, Oregon National Primate Research Center, with a research focus on human and non-human primate stem cell biology.

 

 

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